Julie's Genealogy & History Hub

Julie's Genealogy & History Hub -

Surname Saturday – REEDER (France / Georgia / Iowa)

Mary Eva REEDER (or LASSER) is my second great-grandmother. I am not certain if Reeder or Lasser is her maiden name because each of the records I currently have list one or the other. I suppose it’s possible that she was married once before and that one of the names could be a married name. Perhaps one day I will know the answer, but for now, I’m sticking with Reeder. This family has been difficult to research for many reasons, but mainly because they moved around the country several times.  My direct line ancestors are in blue.

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Fearless Females – Brick Walls

Back in 2010, in honor of Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo created a list of writing prompts for each day during the month of March.  I didn’t participate in 2010, so I’m going to take the opportunity to participate this year, since Lisa was kind enough to resurrect her prompts for 2012.

Is there a female ancestor who is your brick wall? Why? List possible sources for finding more information.

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SNGF – “Heritage Pie” Chart

This week’s challenge from Randy is:

  • List your 16 great-great-grandparents with their birth, death and marriage data (dates and places).
  • Determine the countries (or states) that these ancestors lived in at their birth and at their death.
  • For extra credit, go make a “Heritage Pie” chart for the country of origin (birth place) for these 16 ancestors. [Hint: you could use the  chart generator from Kid Zone for this.] [Note: Thank you to Sheri Fenley for the “Heritage Pie” chart idea.]
  • Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or in a post on Facebook or google+.

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SNGF – Ethnicity

Randy’s challenge for this evening is as follows:

List your 16 great-grandparents in pedigree chart order. List their birth and death years and places.

Figure out the dominant ethnicity or nationality of each of them.

Calculate your ancestral ethnicity or nationality by adding them up for the 16 – 6.25% for each (obviously, this is approximate).

If you don’t know all 16 of your great-grandparents, then do it for the last full generation you have.

Write your own blog post, or make a comment on Facebook or in this post.

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